miércoles, 20 de febrero de 2013

Caliterra Tributo Single Vineyard Carmenere Boldo Block 2010 (D.O. Valle de Colchagua)


CALITERRA TRIBUTO SINGLE VINEYARD CARMENERE BOLDO BLOCK 2010 (D.O. VALLE DE COLCHAGUA)

- The winery: Caliterra was established in 1996 as a joint venture between the families of Robert Mondavi and Vina Errazuriz. In January 2004 Vina Errazuriz became the sole owners of Caliterra, at the heart of which is the impressive 1.000 ha Caliterra Estate. The name Caliterra is taken from 'Calidad' spanish for quality and 'Tierra' - land. The wine making philosophy of Caliterra is to produce fruit driven quality wines. Viña Caliterra is located in the heart of Colchagua, a protected valley southeast of Lago Rapel and adjoining the Apalta Valley, 150 meters above sea level. Crucially a large proportion of this estate, and all new plantings, are on prime hillside sites resulting in high quality fruit and complex wines. The Tributo Carménère is a blend of 91% Carménère, 4% Cabernet Sauvignon, 3% Petit Verdot and 2% Malbec. The wine aged in oak barrels, 70% American and 30% French, for a period of fourteen months. In this phase, malolactic fermentation took place.
- Tasting Notes: The wine has rich aromas of roasted red pepper, coffee and soy sauce follow through a well integrated and full-bodied palate of rich black fruit, vanilla and oak spice with hints of chocolate and firm tannins.
- Food & Wine match: Try with grilled and roasted red meats, casseroles / stews, mature strong cheese.
- Price: £10.25

COLCHAGUA VALLEY WINE REGION

The Colchagua Valley is a wine-producing region in central Chile, constituting the southernmost portion of the larger Rapel Valley. The Cachapoal Valley, to the north, makes up the other half.

Colchagua is a little cooler than its northerly cousin Maipo. but still maintains a consistently Mediterranean climate. As with most areas of Chile, the Pacific Ocean offers a cooling influence, a saving grace at a latitude of 34 degrees south, which is closer to the equator than any European
vineyard. The degree of cooling provided by the ocean varies from east to west in the Colchagua Valley, demonstrated by the distribution of red and white grape varieties. As a general rule, white varieties benefit from cooler climates, while red varieties capitalize on drier, warmer conditions. The dominance of Cabernet Sauvionon, Carmenere, Malbec and Merlot plantings in the warmer east is mirrored by that of Chardonnay and Sauvionon Blanc in the ocean-cooled west.
The Tinguiririca river is a key feature in Colchagua, as it flows along the northern edge of the region and through the town of Santa Cruz, around which many wineries are based. The river brings clear meltwater down from the Andean peaks to the valleys and vineyards below, transporting silts and clays with it and creating ideal soils and terrains for viticulture.

The Tignuiririca river is a key feature in Colchagua, as it flows along the northen edge of the region and through the town of Santa Cruz, around which many wineries are based. The river brings clear meltwater down from the Andean peaks to the valleys and vineyards below, transporting silts and clays with it and creating ideal soils and terrains for viticulture.

CARMENERE

The Carménère grape is a wine grape variety originally planted in the Médoc region of Bordeaux, France, where it was used to produce deep red wines and occasionally used for blending purposes in the same manner as Petit Verdot.

A member of the Cabernet family of grapes, the name "Carménère" originates from the French word for crimson (carmin) which refers to the brilliant crimson colour of the autumn foliage prior to leaf-fall. The grape is also known as Grande Vidure, a historic Bordeaux synonym, although current European Union regulations prohibit Chilean imports under this name into the European Union. Along with Cabernet sauvignon, Cabernet franc, Merlot, Malbec and Petit verdot, Carménère is considered part of the original six red grapes of Bordeaux, France.

Now rarely found in France, the world's largest area planted with this variety is in Chile in South America, with more than 8,800 hectares (2009) cultivated in the Central Valley. As such, Chile produces the vast majority of Carménère wines available today and as the Chilean wine industry grows, more experimentation is being carried out on Carménère's potential as a blending grape, especially with Cabernet Sauvignon.

Carménère is also grown in Italy's Eastern Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia regions and in smaller quantities in the California and Walla Walla regions of the United States.

Carménère wine has a deep red color and aromas found in red fruits, spices and berries. The tannins are gentler and softer than those in Cabernet Sauvignon and it is a medium body wine. Although mostly used as a blending grape, wineries do bottle a pure varietal Carménère which, when produced from grapes at optimal ripeness, imparts a cherry-like, fruity flavor with smoky, spicy and earthy notes and a deep crimson color. Its taste might also be reminiscent of dark chocolate, tobacco, and leather. The wine is best to drink while it is young.

One of the most ancient European varieties, Carménère is thought to be the antecedent of other better-known varieties; some consider the grape to be "a long-established clone of Cabernet Sauvignon." It is possible that the variety name is an alias for what is actually the Vidure, a local Bordeaux name for a Cabernet Sauvignon clone once thought to be the grape from which all red Bordeaux varieties originated.

There have also been suggestions that Carménère may be Biturica, a vine praised in ancient Rome and also the name by which the city of Bordeaux was known during that era. This ancient variety originated in Iberia (modern-day Spain and Portugal), according to Pliny the Elder; indeed, it is currently a popular blending variety with Sangiovese in Tuscany called "Predicato di Biturica"

The Carménère grape has known origins in the Médoc region of Bordeaux, France and was also widely planted in the Graves until the vines were struck with oidium. It is almost impossible to find Carménère wines in France today, as a Phylloxera plague in 1867 nearly destroyed all the vineyards of Europe, afflicting the Carménère grapevines in particular such that for many years the grape was presumed extinct. When the vineyards were replanted, growers could not replant Carménère as it was extremely hard to find and more difficult to grow than other grape varieties common to Bordeaux. The region's damp, chilly spring weather gave rise to coulure, "a condition endemic to certain vines in climates which have marginal, sometimes cool, wet springs", which prevented the vine's buds from flowering. Yields were lower than other varieties and the crops were rarely healthy; consequently wine growers chose more versatile and less coulure-susceptible grapes when replanting the vines and Carménère planting was progressively abandoned.

Carménère favors a long growing season in moderate to warm climates. During harvest time and the winter period the vine fares poorly if it is introduced to high levels of rain or irrigation water. This is particularly true in poor-soil plantings where the vine would need more water. Over-watering during this period accentuates the herbaceous and green pepper characteristics of the grape. The grape naturally develops high levels of sugar before the tannins achieve ripeness. If grown in too hot a climate the resulting wine will have a high alcohol level and low balance. Carménère buds and flowers three to seven days later than Merlot and the yield is lower than that of the latter grape. The Carménère leaves turn to crimson before dropping.

Carménère is produced in wineries either as a single-variety wine (sometimes called a varietal wine), or as a blend usually with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet franc and/or Merlot.

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