martes, 12 de marzo de 2013

Champagne Forget-Brimont 1er Cru Extra Brut NV


CHAMPAGNE FORGET-RIMONT 1er CRU EXTRA BURT NV

"Champagne Forget-Brimont 1er Cru Brut has freshness of green apples with white flowers and nuts, with a lightly honeyed finish, dense, rich and refined. Food & Wine match: Can be drunk as an aperitif, it is good with veal and is a great match for sole". farehamwinecellar

"Plenty of apple notes, showings hints of tobacco and orange peel, with a firm structure for support. Balanced between richness and a tart, chalky finish." 88 Points, Wine Spectator

- Wine information: Champagne "Forget Brimont is a small producer of Champagne located in Craon de Ludes. 6th Generation Champenoise Michel Forget is the current owner and winemaker and the estate can trace it roots back to the early nineteenth century when his ancestor, Louis, first created vineyards in the area. The Champagne Forget Brimont brand was established in 1920 by another relative, Eugène. The company owns 15 hectares of vineyards in the Montage de Reims with Grand Cru vineyards at Mailly Champagne and Verzenay, and Premier Cru vineyards at Chigny-Les-Roses, Ludes and Villers-Allerand. Pinot Noir is the most predominantly planted grape variety. Approximately 280,000 bottles of Champagne are produced in a normal vintage and around 55% is destined for export markets. Forget Brimont’s Cellars are dug out of the chalky soils (that Champagne is famous for) to a depth of 15 metres. This means that the cellars are at a constant temperature of 10.5 degrees centigrade in both summer and winter – the optimum ageing conditions for Champagne. The non-vintage Champagnes are a blend of three different vintages of wine (allowing them to maintain a house style) and are aged a minimum of two years prior to release. Brimont’s Vintage Champagnes are aged between three and ten years prior to release, this ensures that the Champagnes arrive at perfect maturity for immediate drinking, although they can be cellared for longer if required. Champagne Forget Brimont is a NM (Négociant Manipulant) producer of Champagne, which means, like most other producers they buy grapes in to make the wine. This wine has the body and fruitiness of Pinot noir, the softness of Pinot Meunier and the finesse of Chardonnay. An harmonious and well-balanced wine. 40% Pinot Noir, 40% Pinot Meunier and 20% Chardonnay". farehamwinecellar

- Price: £24.10

CHAMPAGNE WINE REGION

The Champagne wine region (archaic English: Champany) is a historic province within the administrative province of Champagne in the northeast of France. The area is best known for the production of the sparkling white wine that bears the region's name. EU law and the laws of most countries reserve the term "Champagne" exclusively for wines that come from this region located about 100 miles (160 km) east of Paris. The viticultural boundaries of Champagne are legally defined and split into five wine producing districts within the administrative province: Aube, Côte des Blancs, Côte de Sézanne, Montagne de Reims, and Vallée de la Marne. The towns of Reims and Épernay are the commercial centers of the area.

Located at the northern edges of the wine growing world, the history of the Champagne wine region has had a significant role in the development of this unique terroir. The area's proximity to Paris promoted the region's economic success in its wine trade but also put the villages and vineyards in the path of marching armies on their way to the French capital. Despite the frequency of these military conflicts, the region developed a reputation for quality wine production in the early Middle Ages and was able to continue that reputation as the region's producers began making sparkling wine with the advent of the great Champagne houses in the 17th & 18th centuries.

The principal grapes grown in the region include Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier.
- Pinot Noir is the most widely planted grape in the Aube region and grows very well in Montagne de Reims.
- Pinot Meunier is the dominant grape in the Vallée de la Marne region.
- Côte des Blancs is dedicated almost exclusively to Chardonnay.

The Champagne province is located near the northern limits of the wine world along the 49th parallel. The high altitude and mean annual temperature of 10 °C (50 °F) creates a difficult environment for wine grapes to fully ripen. Ripening is aided by the presence of forests which helps to stabilize temperatures and maintain moisture in the soil. The cool temperatures serve to produce high levels of acidity in the resulting grape which is ideal for sparkling wine.

During the growing season, the mean July temperature is 18 °C (66 °F). The average annual rainfall is 630 mm (25 inches), with 45 mm (1.8 inches) falling during the harvest month of September. Throughout the year, growers must be mindful of the hazards of fungal disease and early spring frost.

Ancient oceans left behind chalk subsoil deposits when they receded 70 million years ago. Earthquakes that rocked the region over 10 million years ago pushed the marine sediments of belemnite fossils up to the surface to create the belemnite chalk terrain. The belemnite in the soil allows it to absorb heat from the sun and gradually release it during the night as well as providing good drainage. This soil contributes to the lightness and finesse that is characteristic of Champagne wine. The Aube area is an exception with predominately clay based soil. The chalk is also used in the construction of underground cellars that can keep the wines cool through the bottle maturation process.

No hay comentarios:

Publicar un comentario